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July 17, 2014

One of the 1000 meter tall skyscrapers proposed in China for 2018 could have 100 stories of vertical garden or vertical farm and they are not SkyCity

The Phoenix Towers are proposed supertall skyscrapers planned for construction in Wuhan, China.

At 1 kilometre (3,300 ft) high, the towers will be the tallest structure in the world when completed. The towers are being designed by Chetwoods Architects. Completion is planned for 2018 at a cost of GB£1.2 billion (US$2.05 billion)

Description

The Phoenix Towers are being designed by London-based Chetwoods Architects in partnership with HuaYan Group. The project will consist of two buildings, representing the male and female dualistic aspects of Chinese culture. The taller tower, Feng will have about 100 floors for residential living, offices and retail space. The slightly smaller Huang tower will contain "the World's tallest garden". The towers will be constructed on an island in a lake, covering a 7-hectare (17-acre) site.

Eiffel tower like steel structure around a more normal narrow building

The buildings will be constructed on a steel superstructure with concrete cores and buttresses. The exterior will be covered in photovoltaic panels.
The towers will incorporate green energy technologies including wind, solar, thermal, biomass boilers and hydrogen fuel cells.

Pending the blessing of Wuhan’s mayor, developers expect to break ground before the end of the year and finish construction in 2018. When complete, Feng, the slightly taller “male” Phoenix tower, will use wind turbines, hydrogen fuel cells, and other strategies to fully supply Huang, the “female” tower, with renewable power. Moreover, plans for Feng include roughly 100 stories of offices, residences, and retail, whereas the full kilometer of Huang’s interior will be devoted to nurturing the world’s tallest garden.



They are also part of a larger masterplan for the city of Wuhan, which has been recognised as an environmental supercity by the regional and central government.





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