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September 20, 2013

Joe Eck has made his seventh room temperature superconductor and has found a theory for why his method and materials work

Superconductors.ORG (Joe Eck) reports the 38 C superconductor discovered in July 2013 has been reformulated to produce a Meissner transition near 42 Celsius (107F, 315K). This was accomplished by substituting tin (Sn) into the lead (Pb) atomic sites of the D212 structure (shown below left), changing the formula to Tl5Sn2Ba2SiCu8O16+. Multiple magnetization plots clearly show diamagnetic transitions consistently appearing about 4 degrees higher than with Pb in the same atomic site(s). This is the seventh material found to superconduct above room temperature.

A theory put forth nearly 20 years ago seems to explain why planar weight disparity correlates so strongly with high temperature superconductors.

In the mid 1990's Howard Blackstead of Notre Dame and John Dow of A.S.U., postulated that oxygen located in the "chain layer" of a crystal lattice was being compressed into a metallic superconducting state.

"Experimental evidence indicates that the holes of the hypocharged oxygen in the charge-reservoir regions contribute primarily to the superconductivity, contrary to most current models of high- temperature superconductivity, which are based on superconductivity originating in the cuprate-planes. The data suggest that a successful theory of high-temperature superconductivity will be BCS-like and will pair holes through the polarization field, perhaps electronic as well as vibrational polarization."

Hypercharged copper, hypocharged oxygen, and high-temperature superconductivity



ABSTRACT

Hypocharged oxygen, and not hypercharged Cu+3 is shown to be the generator of high-temperature superconductivity. Models based on Cu+2$ARLRCu+3 charge-fluctuations (such as t-J models), are ruled out experimentally. Experimental evidence indicates that the holes of the hypocharged oxygen in the charge-reservoir regions contribute primarily to the superconductivity,contrary to most current models of high- temperature superconductivity, which are based on superconductivity originating in the cuprate-planes. The data suggest that a successful theory of high-temperature superconductivity will be BCS-like and will pair holes through the polarization field, perhaps electronic as well as vibrational polarization.


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