November 04, 2012

Germans follow Italians, Americans and Canadian and others to Pursue Kite Generated Wind Power

German researchers are sending stunt kites into the skies to harness the wind and convert the kinetic energy generated into electricity.

Compared to conventional wind farm technology that relies on rotors, this technology offers a wide range of advantages. Wind speeds at ground level tend to zero, but they increase dramatically the higher you go. At a height of 100 meters wind speeds are around 15 meters a second; at 500 meters they exceed 20 meters a second. “The energy yield of a kite far exceeds that of a wind turbine, whose rotor tips turn at a maximum height of 200 meters. Doubling the wind speed results in eight times the energy,” says Montnacher. “Depending on wind conditions, eight kites with a combined surface area of up to 300 square meters can equate to 20 conventional 1-megawatt wind turbines.”

Kites do not have to struggle with the constancy of the wind the way turbines do, because the higher you go, the windier things get. Figures for the past year show that at a height of 10 meters, there is only about a 35 percent chance of wind speeds reaching 5 meters a second, but at 500 meters that likelihood goes up to 70 percent. This makes any number of new lowland sites viable for the production of wind energy. Another advantage is that it costs considerably less to build a system that, among other things, does not require towers each weighing hundreds of tons.

Many others are pursuing kite generated wind power.

The Italian Kitegen company has been a leader in developing kite generated wind power.



At a test site in Mecklenburg-West Pomerania, IPA researchers and NTS GmbH have already been able to send a kite on its maiden voyage along a 400-meter-long straight track. A remote control similar to those used to fly model planes was used to manually control the kite. The experts now want to reconfigure the test track making it into a loop. Computers will eventually be used to achieve fully automatic control of the kites.

“According to our simulations, we could use an NTS track running a total of 24 kites to generate 120 gigawatt hours a year (GWh/year). To put this into perspective, a 2-megawatt wind turbine produces around 4 GWh/year. So an NTS system could replace 30 2-megawatt turbines and supply power to around 30,000 homes,” says Guido Lütsch, managing director of NTS GmbH. After successful test flights on the demonstration track, the project partners are confident that their computer simulations will hold up in reality. The first investors are already on board.

If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on ycombinator or StumbleUpon. Thanks

Congratulations! Now you can use SolidOpinion commenting system in all its magnificence! Click the link to get your password.

Форма для связи

Name

Email *

Message *