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June 22, 2012

MIT LENR device publicly running for 6 months but Mainstream Researchers Still Able Block Funding

Energy Catalyzer - A Low Energy Nuclear Device (LENR) device in Professor Peter Hagelstein’s lab at MIT has been running since January (nearly six months) and may have produced 1000 times the energy of a comparable chemical reaction.

The device is the NANOR created by Mitchell Swartz of JET Energy Inc. Hagelstein revealed details of the device’s operation in a talk at the Atom Unexplored Conference in Turin, Italy on May 4. A series of videos of the conference is now available on YouTube and it indicates some exciting results. The video quality is pretty lousy and Mr. Hagelstein isn’t a good public speaker but they’re well worth watching.

Hagelstein said Swartz used nano technology to embed palladium in a zirconium matrix. He said this was a revolutionary design. This enabled Swartz to build an LENR device that Hagelstein can take into his laboratory and observe the reactions first hand. The device apparently produces an energy gain of 14.



This is reproducible and reliable excess heat. It is not at the level of power of the more extraordinary claims of Rossi and Defkalion but it is enough to show that there is a real effect that requires proper investigation.



Funding offer made until "major physicist" quashed it

In another video Hagelstein revealed that he had convinced some executives at a major corporation in the United States to fund LENR research at MIT. The research would have been an attempt to duplicate some of Piantelli’s work.

Hagelstien said he got the money but an “important physicist at MIT blocked the research. To make matters worse the physicist called the vice president of the company funding the research and said what Hagelstein called impolite things. He said this got the funding stopped and that the executives who were interested in LENR were worried that they might lose their jobs. Hagelstein did not reveal the name of the company or the important physicist.




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