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April 12, 2012

Progress for waste heat engine to make clean power from biomass integrated with biochar to remediate water and soil pollution

Cyclone’s Waste Heat Engine (WHE, pronounced “we”) recaptures heat from external sources to create steam which powers the engine. The WHE models are designed to run a grid-tied or primary electric power generator while producing ZERO Emissions.

The WHE is designed to run on heat as low as 500ºF from many different external sources of “wasted” heat such as:

* Commercial or small-scale industrial ovens or furnaces
* Landfill and industrial gas flares
* Engine exhaust – from vehicles or power generators
* Biomass combustion – dry, vegetative waste materials


A licensee in China, Great Wall Alternative Power Systems Ltd., has completed the build of the first prototype engines under its License Agreement with the Company, and has begun in-house testing of these units.

The engines built by Great Wall are based on Cyclone’s WHE-25 design, and are meant for use with biomass-to-power generator systems. Applications will include distributed combined heat and power (CHP) systems, and power sources for bio-char producing environmental remediation equipment. Initial compressed air testing of Great Wall’s engines has been successful, and steam testing will commence shortly. These units will ultimately be manufactured and sold only in China.

Great Wall’s Managing Director, Robert Devine, commented: “We see a multi-billion dollar market for distributed power in China’s rural areas. With the Cyclone Engine, we can deliver viable, low cost biomass-based power solutions integrated with a bio-char process that can help remediate water and soil pollution. Operating within China can sometimes be challenging, and that has admittedly pushed back our production schedule. We are pleased to be back on track, and fully committed to seeing this project through to completion.”








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