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July 06, 2011

Nanocrystalline cellulose as strong as Kevlar and extracted from plants is heading to commercialization in Canada

A new Edmonton-based pilot facility will be the first in Canada to produce the quality of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) that researchers need to fully explore all its potential applications.

The $5.5-million pilot plant, created through a collaboration of the provincial and federal governments in partnership with industry under the Western Economic Partnership Agreement (WEPA), will use wood and straw pulp, like that from flax and hemp, to create up to 100 kg per week of NCC for testing in commercial applications leading to production.

Nanocrystalline cellulose can be as strong or stronger than Kevlar (Cellulose 70 to 137 GPa and Kevlar 100 GPa - tensile strength)



One ounce of NCC added to one pound of plastic can make a composite material up to 3000-times stronger than the original plastic alone.

Adding NCC to materials increases their strength and stiffness. Just a small amount can increase resistance to stress threefold, making it attractive as a high-performance reinforcing material.

NCC can also alter the surface of material such as paper, changing its permeability, strength, flexibility and optical properties.

A little NCC boosts paper's gloss and changes its strength, stiffness, surface smoothness and bulk, paving the way for new types with novel applications and for paints, varnishes and advanced high-strength materials.

Optical films enhanced with NCC are suited for use in specialty packaging, biosensors and security devices and could even help prevent counterfeiting.

In addition, because NCC is affected by magnetic and electrical fields, it could prove useful as a filler in magnetic paper, electronic memory cards and readers, and other electronic products.

Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) cab be used for drug delivery excipient

68 page presentation Bio-based Nanocomposites: Challenges and Opportunities (from about 2005)

Presumably the Celluforce joint venture of Domtar and FPInnovations will be targeting lower prices and higher production volumes.




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