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January 24, 2011

Tegra 2 PC that needs only 3 watts of power

CompuLab has announced a new miniature computer powered by NVIDIA's Tegra 2 processing platform that's said to be its smallest, most energy efficient model to date

The 5.1 x 3.7 x 0.6-inch (130 x 95 x 15mm) Trim-Slice is the company's smallest and most energy efficient model to date, having an average operational draw of just 3 Watts Israel's CompuLab makes a range of energy efficient mini-PCs. The Trim-Slice computer is said to offer the rich multimedia capabilities and user experience of a full-size PC at only a fraction of the power draw. It benefits from a fanless design, Wireless-N connectivity, solid state memory and expansion via both a full size and a micro SD card slots.



It has a 1GHz Dual Core ARM Cortex A9 processor and an ultra low power, high definition GeForce graphics unit sit together on the same chip. Supporting players include 1GB DDR2 memory and 64GB of solid state storage, with expansion possible via the duo of media card slots.

The current products from CompuLab are selling on Amazon for about $300-400 with different Atom processors. The new Trim-slice will probably be in the same price range.



Fit PC3

CompuLab's Irad Stavi told Gizmag that the new 6.3 x 6.3 x 0.98-inch (160 x 160 x 24.8mm) fit-PC3's "system power consumption will be more than 10W for all configurations (for some – much more), but for twice the computing performance and an order of magnitude better graphics – it is a trade-off many users may find reasonable." Even 10W or more is a fraction of the power needed to run your average desktop PC.

The mini-PC will be available with a 1GHz AMD G-T40N processor with Radeon HD 6250 graphics, or with a bit more oomph courtesy of a 1.6GHz AMD G-T56N processor with a Radeon HD 6310 GPU.


A 1.2 GHz dual core Tegra 2 3D chip will be available this spring and a quadcore 1.5 Ghz Tegra 3 chip should be available in the fall and next year there will be the quadcore Tegra 4.


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