August 25, 2010

Cisco and Verizon are pushing for true holograms and 3D TV delivered via 1 Gigabit Per Second Fiber Network by 2020

Ad Support : Nano Technology   Netbook    Technology News    Computer Software

Cisco predicts that high-definition TV and 3D TV content will increase 13 times between 2009 and 2014. In total, HDTV and 3D video will account for 42 percent of the video on the Internet by 2014. Cisco predicts that in the next four years, more than 90 percent of all content traversing the Net will be some form of video, whether it's peer-to-peer or streamed from servers.

Beyond 3D video, Chambers sees holographic technology as being the next truly big advancement in video technology. "3D will make things more lifelike, " he said. "But I think in 10 years we'll be seeing holograms used. Not only can this be used to enhance business communications, but imagine the implications for certain vertical businesses like medicine."

Verizon Communications Chief Information Officer Shaygan Kheradpir said his company is already working with researchers to bring holographic technologies into homes and small businesses. And the medical industry is one place where he sees a particularly good fit for holograms.


Cisco and Verizon executives say that the 3D TV revolution won't stop with consumer services. They also expect the technology to make its way into businesses. Chambers wouldn't specify when, but he said the company's telepresence video conferencing service, which today uses high-definition video, will eventually be 3D-enabled.

Whether executives will sit around Cisco telepresence conference rooms with 3D video glasses is unknown. Chambers seemed confident that the technology would eventually get to a point where glasses are unnecessary. Toshiba is already talking about making a glasses-free 3D TVs for the Japanese market.

Verizon Communications Chief Information Officer Shaygan Kheradpir said his company is already working with researchers to bring holographic technologies into homes and small businesses. And the medical industry is one place where he sees a particularly good fit for holograms.

Kheradpir wouldn't offer specifics of what Verizon is working on with its research partners, but he said that it has been playing around with sending holographic images of someone's head across its Fios fiber-optic network.

He said this could be a very useful application for doctors and other medical professionals.

"A hologram of a patient can be beamed right to the home of the doctor, who could rotate the image and make a diagnosis," he said.

Kheradpir said his father was an ear, nose, and throat doctor, who spent most of his time running back and forth to the hospital to see patients.

"Just think of how much more time he would have been able to spend with his family if he had this technology," he said. "He would not have had to go into the ER as often as he did. Most times all he needed to do was ask someone to open his mouth and say 'ah.'"

Verizon recently announced that it had field tested the first ever 1Gbps link to a business using Verizon's existing Fios infrastructure. Kheradpir, who lives on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, has also been testing the 1Gbps service in his home. On a recent tour of his home to show off new Fios TV services and features, he said that holography is the type of application that would need such high speed connections.


If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on Reddit, or StumbleUpon. Thanks

Supporting Advertising

Business Success
   How to Make Money    
Executive Jobs    
Paid Surveys


Thank You

Congratulations! Now you can use SolidOpinion commenting system in all its magnificence! Click the link to get your password.

Форма для связи

Name

Email *

Message *