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June 16, 2009

Blacklight Power publishes Paper that They Claim Provides Support of their Controversial Theory of Hydrogen

Blacklight Power has a 26 page pdf paper "Fast H in Hydrogen Mixed Gas Microwave Plasmas When an Atomic Hydrogen Supporting Surface was Present", which they claim supports their theories of Hydrogen. Still the main thing that will matter is if Blacklight Power is able to produce superior power generation systems using their technology.

Atomic hydrogen is heated to temperatures of up to two orders of magnitude greater than the electron temperature or the temperature of any other species in certain hydrogen mixed gas RF or glow discharge plasmas. A crucial test of energetic hydrogen chemistry regarding a resonant energy transfer or rt-mechanism (RTM) versus field acceleration models (FAM) as the basis of this selective isotropic heating of a population of extraordinarily high-kinetic-energy hydrogen atoms is the observation of fast H in microwave cells proven to lack a high field as shown by the complete absence of fast H (~0.08 eV) by Jovicevic et al. The RTM predicts an enhancement in the production of fast H with the presence of a surface to support a high concentration of hydrogen atoms in order to initiate the energetic hot-H source reaction that then prorogates isotropically throughout the plasma. In contrast to the prior results, extraordinarily fast H of greater than 4 eV (50 times that observed and deemed possible in the Evenson microwave cell by FAM advocate Jovicevic et al.) and 50% fractional population was observed as predicted for RTM using the catalytic reaction systems of He/H2, Ar/H2, pure H2, and water vapor microwave plasmas when an electrically insulating, but atomic-hydrogen supporting material was placed in the plasma region. Increasing concentrations of Xe in the non-catalytic Xe/H2 system results in a significant decrease in the energy and population of fast excited-state H atoms.







In this study, we made specific theoretical predictions based on the RTM and tested them against FAMs, the competing theories for fast H, with standard easily interpretable experiments regarding the observation of fast H in microwave plasmas. Specifically, it is impossible according to FAM for fast H to be observed in hydrogen mixed gas microwave plasmas as unequivocally shown by Jovicevic et al. In contrast RTM predicts that fast H can be observed if the chemical conditions are present to support the reaction.

Other characteristic signatures of the reaction involving a resonant, nonradiative energy transfer from otherwise stable atomic hydrogen to the catalysts He+ and 2H capable of accepting the energy to form hydrinos, H(1/ p), were observed and reported previously. The catalyst energy transfer to pump the He+ ion energy levels and increase the electron excitation temperature of H in helium-hydrogen and hydrogen plasmas was confirmed spectroscopically. In the former case, the pumping in microwave plasma caused an inversion of the ion to atom line ratios, and in both cases, the Texcitation was extraordinarily high, 2.5 eV to 3 eV, a factor of three increase over the typical temperature. For both catalysts, the energy due to the electron undergoing a radial transition to occupy a state of nearer radius was observed spectroscopically on pulsed DC plasmas as a characteristic EUV continuum with a cutoff at 22.8 nm and extending to longer wavelengths. It was also observed as third-body kinetic energy wherein a resonant kinetic energy transfer to form fast H was the source of extraordinary (>50 eV) Balmer α line broadening in DC and RF plasmas. The predicted molecular hydrino, H2 (1 / 4) , was observed at 1.25 ppm by solution NMR on gases collected from heliumhydrogen, water-vapor-assisted hydrogen, hydrogen, and strontium-argon-hydrogen rt-plasmas and dissolved in an NMR solvent. Thus, the experimental confirmation of all four predictions for transitions of atomic hydrogen to form hydrinos has been achieved on different plasma sources.

It was anticipated that with sufficient enhancement of the reaction rate in microwave plasmas, the same fast H phenomenon observed on other plasma sources could be observed in microwave plasmas despite the unfavorably low electron temperature for excitation relative to fast-H cooling. A crucial test of energetic hydrogen chemistry regarding a resonant energy transfer or rt-mechanism (RTM) versus field acceleration models (FAM) as the basis of this selective isotropic heating of a population of extraordinarily high-kinetic-energy hydrogen atoms is the observation of fast H in microwave cells proven to lack a high field as shown by the complete absence of fast H by Jovicevic et al. The RTM predicts an enhancement in the production of fast H with the presence of a surface to support a high concentration of hydrogen atoms in order to initiate the energetic hot-H source reaction that then prorogates isotropically throughout the plasma. In contrast to the anticipated prior results, extraordinarily fast H of >4 eV and >50% population was observed as predicted for RTM using the catalytic reaction systems of He/H2, Ar/H2, pure H2, and water vapor microwave plasmas as opposed to non catalytic Xe/H2 system when a hydrogen-supporting material such as a commercial hydrogenation catalyst was placed in the plasma region. This reproduces prior results showing the fast H phenomenon in a system comprising a H-supporting surface wherein a floated thermocouple was present in the plasma to measure the neutral gas temperature. The power source of hot H being from the formation of hydrinos has implications for a commercial power source. The potential is already being realized as the power from the process has been independently confirmed at the 50 kW level with a thorough study by a team at Rowan University. Critic Rathke’s issues regarding the application of classical laws with analytical solutions to atoms and molecules has similarly been dispatched in rebuttal publications and by the demonstration that the results are far advanced of the capabilities of nonphysical quantum mechanical theory with its inherent weirdness, reliance on curve-fitting, and many inescapable failures

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